Look for your sewing machine’s model number below for answers to some commonly asked questions.

 

LSS-202

 

Q. Why won’t my LSS-202 sewing machine pick up the bobbin thread?

A. Please try the following troubleshooting tips:

Make sure you turn the hand wheel counterclockwise (toward you).

It may be helpful to watch the video on the LSS-202 web page.

Please check the bobbin holder to make sure it is not spinning or getting out of place when you turn the hand wheel. The piece under the bobbin holder spins, but the bobbin holder should stay in one place.

The top thread should go between the two metal tension disks. The needle should be pushed up all the way inside the needle bar, with the flat side facing toward the right of the machine (the front of the machine has the words Lil Sew & Sew).

The needle should be threaded from left to right. Please replace the needle if it is bent or broken.

Then make sure you do all these steps:

1. Thread the needle as shown in the manual, and place the bobbin in the bobbin holder.

2. Leave the bobbin holder lid off.

3. Hold the ends of the bobbin thread and top thread in one hand while turning the hand wheel counterclockwise (toward you) with the other hand. Turn the wheel one time, so that the needle goes down and back up to its highest position. The top thread should come around and pick up the bobbin thread.

4. Gently pull the top thread up toward you. You will see it has caught the bobbin thread.

5. The bobbin thread will now be coming out of the hole under the needle. Separate both threads from each other and have them go under the presser foot and hang behind the machine.

6. Replace the bobbin holder lid. The machine is now threaded properly and ready to sew.

 

Q. Why won’t the stitches stay in the fabric when sewing?

A. Please follow the same troubleshooting tips as for picking up the bobbin thread. Then make sure the presser foot is lowered onto the fabric, and lower the needle into the fabric to make a stitch or two before turning the machine on.

 

Q. The stitches on the underside of the fabric look messy and loopy, while the top stitches look normal.

A. This usually means the top thread tension is too low. When you thread the top thread, make sure it is pressed between the two metal tension disks instead of just lying across the top of the disks. If the stitches under the fabric are still loopy, you may need to turn the tension screw clockwise to tighten the tension.

 

Q. The stitches on top of the fabric look messy and loopy, while the bottom stitches look normal.

A. This may mean there is no tension on the bobbin thread, or the top thread tension is too high. Make sure you are using a metal bobbin, since the bobbin tension system is magnetic. Take out the bobbin and look underneath it to make sure the ring-shaped magnet is still in place.

If the magnet is there and the bobbin is metal, but the problem continues, try adjusting the top thread tension. Turn the tension screw counterclockwise to loosen it until the stitching returns to normal.

 

Q. I need to wind more thread on my bobbin. Where is the bobbin winding spindle?

A. The bobbin winding spindle is in the center of the hand wheel. To release it, press the spindle with your thumb and turn it slightly counterclockwise. It will pop out. Turn it slightly clockwise to lock it in place. You can now load a bobbin onto it and begin winding according to the steps in the manual.

When you are done using it, turn the spindle slightly counterclockwise and push it back inside the hand wheel. Turn it slightly clockwise to lock it in place.

 

Q. Why does the machine start sewing as soon as I turn it on? I haven’t pressed the foot pedal yet.

A. This is normal. When you are using the foot pedal, leave the power switch in the OFF position at all times, and the machine will start sewing when you press the foot pedal. If you want to use the machine without the foot pedal, use the power switch to start and stop sewing.

 

Q. What size needle should I use?

A. When buying replacement needles, look for standard sewing machine needles, size 14/90 (also called 90/14). These can be found at many craft stores, sewing stores, or major retailers.

 

LSS-505

 

Q. Why won’t my LSS-505 sewing machine pick up the bobbin thread?

A. Please try the following troubleshooting tips:

It may be helpful to watch the videos on the LSS-505 web page.

Please check the bobbin holder to make sure it is not spinning or getting out of place when you turn the hand wheel. The piece under the bobbin holder spins, but the bobbin holder should stay in one place.

The presser foot should be raised when you thread the top part; otherwise the thread will not go between the tension disks correctly.

The needle should be pushed up all the way inside the needle bar and threaded from front to back. Please replace the needle if it is bent or broken.

The 8-stitch selection dial should have the arrow pointing to a number, not stuck in between numbers.

Thread tension should be 3, 4, or 5.

Then make sure you do all these steps:

1. Thread the needle as shown in the manual, and place the bobbin in the bobbin holder.

2. Leave the bobbin holder lid off.

3. Hold the ends of the bobbin thread and top thread in one hand while turning the hand wheel counterclockwise (toward you) with the other hand. Turn the wheel one time, so that the needle goes down and back up to its highest position. The top thread should come around and pick up the bobbin thread.

4. Gently pull the top thread up toward you. You will see it has caught the bobbin thread.

5. The bobbin thread will now be coming out of the hole under the needle. Separate both threads from each other and have them go under the presser foot and hang behind the machine.

6. Replace the bobbin holder lid. The machine is now threaded properly and ready to sew. Lower the presser foot and do a few stitches by manually turning the hand wheel before turning the machine on.

 

Q. Why won’t the stitches stay in the fabric when sewing?

A. Please follow the same troubleshooting tips as for picking up the bobbin thread. Then make sure the presser foot is lowered onto the fabric, and lower the needle into the fabric to make a stitch or two before turning the machine on.

 

Q. The stitches on the underside of the fabric look messy and loopy, while the top stitches look normal.

A. This usually means the top thread tension is too low.  When you thread the top thread, make sure it is pressed between the two metal tension disks inside the machine, to the right of the tension dial.  That is, make sure you pull the thread through guides 1 and 2 as marked on the machine, and make sure the thread stays there without falling out. This way, when you lower the presser foot, the tension disks will automatically close onto the thread.

If the stitches under the fabric are still loopy, you may need to tighten the tension by turning the dial to a higher number. For most sewing projects, tension should be 3, 4, or 5.

 

Q. The stitches on top of the fabric look messy and loopy, while the bottom stitches look normal.

A. This may mean there is no tension on the bobbin thread, or the top thread tension is too high. Make sure you are using a metal bobbin, since the bobbin tension system is magnetic. Take out the bobbin and look underneath it to make sure the ring-shaped magnet is still in place.

If the magnet is there and the bobbin is metal, but the problem continues, try adjusting the top thread tension. Turn the tension dial to a lower number until the stitching returns to normal.

 

Q. Why does the machine start sewing as soon as I turn it on? I haven’t pressed the foot pedal yet.

A. This is normal. When you are using the foot pedal, leave the power switch in the OFF position at all times, and the machine will start sewing when you press the foot pedal. If you want to use the machine without the foot pedal, use the power switch to start and stop sewing.

 

Q. What size needle should I use?

A. When buying replacement needles, look for standard sewing machine needles, size 14/90 (also called 90/14). These can be found at many craft stores, sewing stores, or major retailers.